Difference between revisions of "Ryamaian languages"

From CWS Planet
Jump to navigation Jump to search
m (→‎Classifications: Not anymore)
m
 
Line 5: Line 5:
| region  = [[Vaniua]], [[Northern Miraria]]
| region  = [[Vaniua]], [[Northern Miraria]]
| familycolor = vaniuan
| familycolor = vaniuan
| family  = [[List of language families|language family]]
| family  = One of Sahar's primary [[List of language families#Language families|language families]]
| protoname = [[Proto-Ryamaian language|Proto-Ryamaian]]
| protoname = [[Proto-Ryamaian language|Proto-Ryamaian]]
| child1  = [[Sirchak languages|Sirchak]]
| child1  = [[Sirchak languages|Sirchak]]

Latest revision as of 22:13, 24 January 2023

Ryamaian
(confirmed)
Geographic
distribution:
Vaniua, Northern Miraria
Linguistic classification:One of Sahar's primary language families
Proto-language:Proto-Ryamaian
Subdivisions:
CWS code

The Ryamaian languages are a language family consisting of the Sirchak, Masic and Vaniuan language families. It was first proposed in 1912 by Adiva Eseyes, an expert in the indigenous languages of Northern Miraria, in his book Anthropology of the Steppe: An Essay on the Cultures of Vaniu and Beyond. The definitive members of the Ryamaian language family vary and as of the present day, only Vaniuan, Sirchak, and Masic have been proven to be related to one another.

History

Classifications

The various subgroups of the Ryamaian languages include three major branches, listed in alphabetical order:

Proto-language

Urheimat

The Ryamaian proto-language is argued by Adiva Eseyes to have been spoken by Mesolithic hunter-pastoralists in eastern Soltenna and Ensia and Suenia around the eastern Gelog Sea between 10,000 and 4,000 BCE, and that the proto-languages of the derived families may have been carried east and southward out of this homeland in several successive waves, north to Central Miraria and south to Vaniua.

Relationships

There has been infrequent claims that the Rietic, Baitaar, Amaian, and East Mirarian language families are related to the Ryamaian language family. However, no conclusive evidence has been proven to confirm any relationship with these languages other than coincidences or the occasional wanderwort spread along the Mirarian steppe. As a result, these relationships are considered pseudo-science in most circles and aren't considered due to a total lack of concrete evidence in support of such relationships.

Further Reading