Address in Notzel

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Like most countries, the address system in Notzel is based on street names. All streets within a town or a city, and most roads in Notzel have a name.

History

The first use of house numbering in Notzel dates back to middle ages in Deglis; however, the nationwide use of the modern street system only started in 1889, when the modern postal system was established in Notzel.

Street Names

In Notzel, all streets in a city or town have a name. Most of the major roads and streets in a city or town are named by alphabetic orders, therefore the name of most streets are like “A street”, “B street”, “C street”, and so on. Few roads through remote areas may have no names, but this is mainly because they are not within or near inhabited areas

Some streets are named after specific facilities, items or people, in honour of these objects. For example, the main avenue in Deglis before the parliament building is called the “Constitution Avenue”; besides, the roads near colleges, libraries, museums, etc. in many towns are often called “College Street“, ”Museum Road“ and such.

Blocks in towns and cities also have their own numbers, but the numbering for city blocks are not used in the address system.

House Numbering

In Notzel, the European scheme is most commonly used for house numbering. Plots on one side of the road are numbered with ascending odd numbers, from 1, and those on the other with ascending even numbers, from 2 (or sometimes 0). The odd numbers are usually on the left side of the road, looking in the direction in which the numbers increase.

Where additional buildings are inserted or subdivided, these subunits are often suffixed 1, 2, 3, etc. Where buildings are later combined, one of the original numbers may be used. Buildings with multiple entrances may have a single number for the entire building or a separate number for each entrance.

Where plots are not built upon gaps may be left in the numbering scheme or marked on maps for the plots, this is especially common in countryside. If buildings are added to a stretch of old street the following may be used rather than a long series of suffixes to the existing numbers: a new name for a new estate/block along the street; a new road name inserted along the course of a street either with or without mention of the parent street; unused numbers above the highest house number may be used (although rarely as this introduces confusing discontinuity), or the upper remainder of the street is renumbered.

Formats of Postal Address

In Notzel, an address is usually mailed this way:

Recipient Name
Other recipient information
Number(of the building), Street name
District/Township, County, State, Postcode

Buildings names that have been registered in the city/town government can be used in place of the number and street names for the building; besides, there‘s no need to write down the full address of specific government facilities in the central government, the name of the facility may be used directly.

Postal Code

In Notzel, Postal Codes are a set of 7-digit numbers. The numbers are divided into four groups, expressed in a 1-2-2-2 scheme, this is, the first group of numbers consist of 1 digit; all the other three groups consist of two digits. The first group indicates the state; the second group of numbers indicates the number of the county or city; the third group of numbers indicates the number of the district(within a city) or the township(within a county); and the last group of numbers indicates the postal area within the district or the township.

The numbering of states are as follows: 1 stands for the Notzel Capital Territory; 2 stands for the State of Veneth; 3 for the State of Spin; 4 for the State of Xovin; 5 for the State of Rivkh; 6 for the State of Zezka and 7 for the State of Dolzod.

Mails sent to overseas locations have the overseas postal code prefixed with 8-, to signify that the location is not in Notzel but in a foreign land.