Nyatol

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Principality of Nyatol
Flag
CapitalNyatol (City-state)
Official languages Lestzi
Recognised national languages Hlung
Minority languages Bosato Creole
Demonym Nyatolan
Government Unitary parliamentary constitutional monarchy
 -  Prince Lorros
Legislature House Regent
Area
 -  210.27 km2
81 sq mi
Population
 -  2012 estimate 2,160,228
 -  Density 10273.59/km2
26,608.5/sq mi
GDP (nominal) estimate
 -  Total $119.75 billion
 -  Per capita $55,432
Gininegative increase 52.1
high
HDI Increase 0.890
very high
Time zone Bosato Time (SCT-1)
Drives on the left
Internet TLD .nt

Nyatol, officially the Principality of Nyatol, is a city state located in southern Soltenna. With an area of only 210.3km2, it is the second smallest sovereign country on Sahar after Yorudbynbad, and borders Bosato to the south and Zaizung to the north.

Originally a small Mañi fishing port, Nyatol was acquired by the Lestzi Duchy of Gshons during the 16th century, where it quickly an important port in facilitating trade between Boroso, Ekuosia and Soltenna. After the annexation of Bosato by the Terminian Three Kingdoms in 1760, Nyatol lost its role as a major centre of trade and entered a period of economic downturn.

Nyatol became part of the Letzian Empire in 1835, though it remained largely under the control of the Duchy of Gshons. The Akulanen War of 1881-87 led to a combined Leszti-Shohuanese defeat of Terminia, resulting in the independence of Bosato and a boost to Nyatol’s then-struggling economy. After the Grand Ekuosian War, the Letzia introduced constitutional reforms that would strip the aristocracy of their hereditary titles and ownership of land. Under pressure to protect Nyatoli business interests along with rising dissatisfaction with Lestzi rule, Nyatol declared independence in 1956, with the son of the former Grand Duke of Gshons, Lorros, becoming the first Prince of Nyatol.

Together with Bosato, Nyatol is a member of the Bosato-Nyatol Partnership and relies on the Bosato Armed Forces for much of its defence. It has a

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