Ru

From CWS Planet
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Democratic Republic of Ruhmya
Kwayyəng Milañiyəng Rukway
Flag Emblem
Anthem: State Anthem of the RDPR
Capital
and
Beho (肥壤 Bayphaw)
Official languages Ru
Demonym Ruhmyan, Ru
Government Unitary one-party republic
 -  Comrade An Sogi
 -  Premier Ma Riaw
Legislature National Assembly
Establishment
 -  Formation of the Yaye Confederation 350 CE 
Population
 -  2021 estimate 33,530,000
Currency Qonklese Chih (QKC)

Ru (Ru: Rukway [ɾú.kʷe]), or Ruhmya (Ru: Rumya [ɾú.mʲa]), officially the Democratic Republic of Ruhmya (Ru: Kweyõ Milayiyõ Rukwe [kʷé.jõː mí.la.ji.jõː ɾú.kʷe]), is a country located in West Soltenna. It borders Qonklaks and shared a maritime border with Yachiro.

Etymology

History

Early History

Not much is known about the history of the Ru before contact with Qonklaks and the eventual Quoncization of the Ru. The Lya Dynasty first recorded the Ruic peoples as the Yaye (Proto-Kwang: 毅爪 *jajân).

The first unified Ruic political entity was the Yaye Confederacy (Ru: Hayza Yaye [é.ja já.je]), which existed from 350 CE to 1014 CE, disbanding into political turmoil in the later years of its existence due to external meddling from the Phõ Dynasty. It was first documented by Phãw scholars during the Second Warring States Period.

The Yaye Confederacy heavily absorbed elements of Qonklese culture, documenting their history in the Yaktsuk Kway Yaye 記寫國毅爪 [ják.suk kwé já.je] "The Chronicles of the Yaye Conferacy" written in 838 CE. Despite this period of intense Quoncization, Yaye remained an independent polity.

Medieval History

Various Ruic kingdoms squabbled over the remains of the Confederacy from 1014-1139 CE until the Phõ Dynasty launched an invasion into Ruic lands, subjugating their lands and setting up the Kingdom of Rongyo 國祖曼 Kway Rəngngrəw [kwé rõ.jo] a puppet dynasty. This dynasty, despite being virtually powerless, enjoyed punctuated periods of prolonged peace.

Rongyo pledged allegiance to the invading Maithic armies as soon as they reached their territories, sparing their citizens from the fate of having their villages pillaged.

Rongyo's cultural identity, being influenced by that of the Phõ Dynasty in Qonklaks, was preserved during the Mai Dynasty.

Modern

Inspired by the Self-Strengthening Restoration in Olboros Qonklaks, a faction of the Rongyo royal court attempted to modernize the Rongyo Royal Army and jumpstart industrialization, but this was met with resistance from King Sedwak.

The fall of the Olboros Dynasty and the establishment of the Republic meant that Rongyo no longer remained a vassal of the Qonklese. King Sesat, son of Sedwak, ascended the throne in 1904 as the king of a free state.

Sesat, finally having modernized the Royal Army in 1924, ….

The re-establishment of the Qonklese monarchy in 1928 meant that Rongyo was threatened with re-vassalization by the Qonklese. This was proven when Dain Pain argued that Rongyo was core Qonklese territory and demanded that King Sesat allow Qonklese soldiers into Rongyo. Threatened by a stronger military and a weak economy, Sesat relunctantly agreed, and Rongyo once again became a vassal state in 1933.

This decision was not well met by the public. Mass protests, especially influenced by the local literatii, broke out across the nation, and had to be quelled by a joint Qonklese-Rongyo policing effort.

King Sesat was forced to abdicate in 1940 in favour of his 8 year old son, Crown Prince Seral. Seral was chosen by the Qonklese for his young age, which was easier to control compared to an experienced leader.


Post-GEW / Cold War

Rongyo surrended to the Helsonians on the same day that the Supreme Commune of Qonklaks was founded. The country was merged into the Union of Supreme Communes of West Soltenna, a new political entity founded from the ashes of the GEW. King Seral, now 18, was trialed at Paseinsẽ for his involvement in the atrocities committed during the war. Despite being found not guilty, he was exiled to Gfiewistan as Ru was now an anti-monarchist kúúlist nation.

Geography

Geology

Climate

Biodiversity

Politics

Government

Administrative divisions

Foreign relations

Military

Economy

Transport

Energy

Science and technology

Tourism

Demographics

Ethnic groups

Urbanisation

Language

Education

Healthcare

Religion

Culture

Heritage

Architecture

Literature

Art

Music

Theatre

Film

Cuisine

Sport

Symbols

See also