Soptenese language

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Soptenese
soptUmimo
Pronunciation[soptʊmimo]
RegionEastern Soltenna
Native speakers12 Million (L1 & L2)  (2021)
Language family
Masic
  • Soptenese
Early forms:
Proto-Masic
  • Old Soptenese
    • Soptenese
Writing systemSoptenese Alphabet, Vaniuan Alphabet
Official status
Official language inSoptemia
CWS codeUOP

Soptenese Is the primary language spoken in Soptemia. It is among the furthest western extent of Ryamaian languages. Soptenese belongs to the Masic language family, which also includes Vanoshan. It is One of the most distinctive Ryamaian languages, due to its isolation from other Ryamaian languages. Soptenese has heavy influences from Rietic languages and some influence from Mahavic languages.

Classification

Soptenese is a Masic language. It branched off from Proto-Masic around 500 B.C.E.

History

Old Soptenese was the most recent ancestor of Soptenese. It was more similar to other Masic languages than modern Soptenese. Over time, Soptenese developed it's vowel system into one with both long-short and fronting distinctions, wherein the strong version is typically a fronted version of the vowel. Around 1700, uppercase letters fell out of fashion, and Soptenese transitioned to a monocameral alphabet. Uppercase letters are still seldom used today, but they are seen as archaic. In 1952 and 1958, The Reform standardized many aspects of Soptenese spelling, orthography and grammar, and offically did away with many archaic rules. It also saw the introduction of standardized short-unfronted vowels.

Phonology

Phonemes

Bilabial Dental Alveolar Post-Alveolar Palatal Velar Glottal
Nasal
m
n
ɲ
ŋ
Plosive
p b
t d
k g
Fricative
ɸ β
θ ð
s z
x
h
Affricate
t͡s d͡z
t͡ʃ d͡ʒ
Approximant
ɹ
j
Trill
r
Front Near-back Back
Close
i i: y y:
u u:
Near-close
ʊ ʊ:
Close-mid
e e: ø ø:
o o:
Open-mid
ɛ ɛ:
Near-open
æ æ:
Open
ɑ ɑ:

Phonotactics

In general, in Soptenese, the maximum allowable syllable is CCVVC. In the onset, any consonant may appear on its own. Clusters in the onset may be made with /s/ in preceding most, but not all consonants. In addition to this, kl, tl and pr are legal. Vowels may appear on their own, or in diphthongs. For the purposes of making diphthongs in Soptenese, vowels are divided into five pairs of "strong" and "weak" vowels, wherein "strong" vowels are generally, but not always fronted versions of their "weak" counterparts. A diphthong always consists of a "weak" vowel followed by a "strong" vowel. In the coda, all consonants may appear, with the exception of /h/. In foreign words, /h/ in the coda is sound-shifted to /x/. Consonant clusters do not appear in the coda.

Stress

Stress in Soptenese is not explicitly marked, but it can always be ascertained from spelling. Typically the penultimate syllable is stressed. If there is only one syllable, that syllable may be stressed. If one of the vowels is long, that vowel is stressed, instead of the penultimate syllable. If there is more than one long vowel, and none of them fall on the penultimate syllable, the final long vowel is stressed.

Morphology and syntax

Vocabulary

Writing and literature

Soptenese is typically written with the Soptenese alphabet. The Soptenese alphabet is largely the same as the Vaniuan Alphabet, with a few stylistic changes, the addition and reuse of some characters in order to accommodate the four-way vowel distinction in Soptenese, as well as the elimination of uppercase characters. Soptenese is often written with the Vaniuan Alphabet. This is made possible by the number of variants in the orthography for many of Soptenese's unique vowels. In recent years, it has become more common in the past decades, especially with the standardization and internationalization of language, to simply write Soptenese using the Vaniuan Alphabet by default.